Norse Gods & Your Week: Sunday

Monday through Friday have ties to Norse mythology, and Saturday… uh… kind of does.

What about Sunday?

Well, there’s an easy answer to that question.

NO.

Sunday is named after – you guessed it – the freaking sun. And that’s the end of the story, my virtual friend.

sunshine
You’d all be screwed without me!

But if you’re the kind of person who wants to bring Norse mythology into everything (and if you are, I love you for it) then Sunday can be tied to Sol, the sun goddess.

Yes, in Norse mythology the sun is pulled in a chariot driven by a woman.

apollo
Sorry, Apollo

Sol’s brother Mani, the origin of the word Monday, pulls a chariot carrying the moon.

And why does the sun move so quickly across the heavens?

Well, because both Sol and Mani are being freaking chased by giant wolves named Skoll (Treachery) and Hati (Hate).

800px-The_Wolves_Pursuing_Sol_and_Mani
Run, baby, run!

And the wolves will catch them, once Ragnarök begins.

Sleep well, friends!

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5 comments

  1. Hmmmm.. there are probably many versions, as the Norse mythology once was extended far beyond Skandinavia, but in the Norwegian myths, the wolf who eats the sun is Fenrir, or Fenris as the Norwegians call him, son of Loki, and he’s chained in a cave until Ragnarok comes… Any thoughts?

    Like

    • Why yes, I have MANY thoughts about Loki’s children! There are lots of versions of the myths, and there’s not exactly an established canon, so there’s really no right or wrong when it comes to Norse mythology. I take most of my ideas (the ones I’m not totally making up, at least) from the Eddas, and these give mildly conflicting accounts of Ragnarok. In the Poetic Edda, Fenris slays Odin (stanza 53), is then slain by Odin’s son Vithar (stanza 54), and only at the very end of the destruction, in stanza 57, does the sun “turn black.” In the Prose Edda, an unnamed wolf swallows the sun just before the earthquake that snaps the fetters holding Fenris. I figured this wolf is probably Skoll the sun-chasing wolf because, when Skoll is first introduced, the author says he’ll eventually catch the sun. Cheerful, huh? 😉

      Liked by 1 person

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